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Asperger Sufferers Complain About Facebook Group

Some members of a social network group have reported that they are being bullied and have raised concerns about the heavy handed tactics on the creator imposed rules of posting links, links to supporting site of the topics that are being discussed.

Advertorials differ from traditional advertisements in that they are designed to look like the articles that appear in the publication. Most publications will not accept advertisements that look exactly like stories from the newspaper or magazine they are appearing in. The differences may be subtle, and disclaimers—such as the word "advertisement"—may or may not appear. Sometimes euphemisms describing the advertorial as a "special promotional feature" or "special advertising section" are used. The tone of the advertorials is usually closer to that of a press release than of an objective news story.

Advertorials can also be printed and presented as an entire newspaper section, inserted the same way within a newspaper as store fliers, comics sections, and other non-editorial content. These sections are usually printed on a smaller type of broadsheet and different newsprint than the actual paper. Many newspapers and magazines will assign staff writers or freelancers to write advertorials, usually without a byline credit. A major difference between regular editorial and advertorial is that clients usually have content approval of advertorials, a luxury usually not provided with regular editorial.

A related practice is the creation of material that looks like traditional media (for instance, a newspaper or magazine) but is actually created by a company to market its products. One familiar example is airline in-flight magazines, which may feature reports about travel destinations to which the airline flies.

Some members of a social network group have reported that they are being bullied, members of the Asperger’s Awareness Community on Social Networking Site Facebook created by Gemmarella Leanne Goode have raised concerns about the heavy handed tactics on the creator imposed rules of posting links, links to supporting site of the topics that are being discussed.

 

Photo: The group posts daily topics that members can suggest, or that the creator Gemmarella Leanne Goode suggests or posts.

The Paragraph has been contacted by members after they have been removed and banned for challenging the removal of their posting links that illustrate the very topics proposed by the topic poster!

One individual who did not want to be named, said “I posted official links, they were not SPAM and others were doing the same, to support the topic that was posted, I sent a private message to the admin Gemmarella Leanne Goode asking why she was removing links to posts that supported and provided evidence and information, I received back a bullying and intimidating message, and then I returned to the page and posted that the rules on bullying clearly didn’t apply to the page admin as they bullied by not allowing supporting links”.

Photo: Gemmarella Leanne Goode, who is listed at the Group Administrator.

The former group member continues ” I feel I have been discriminated and bullied, by someone who was said to be providing a safe area for people with Asperger’s to socialise and communicate, being banned as made me angry, I was not spamming, I feel very strongly about this, that I have reported this bullying to the Police”.

“I have now created a page where people can post supporting links to posts, as I feel this is needed, so that people can read up on what people are asking or saying.”

Photo: Gemmarella Leanne Goode has stated on her profile that she is ” Against Bullying” – but it would seem that she does not practise what she preaches from what The Paragraph has seen, and been told

Bullying someone or subjecting them to intimidation due to their disability is illegal and is classed as Disability Hate Crime, which the Police take seriously.

Asperger’s Awareness Community has presence on Twitter @Aspergersfacebk

The Paragraph has contacted Gemmarella Leanne Goode and she replied with the following email:

“I’m sure you’ll see the other side of this story by reading what everybody else has to say. Our members have always been very supporting and understanding that I need to protect myself. I’m shocked at the invasion of privacy, the accusations and the sheer one sidedness of all this and can assure you that I will be taking matters further. Thank you for your interest in protecting people with Aspergers. It is very important. But please change the part ‘Aspergers sufferers’ as many people will see that as an insult.

 Gemmarella also included a link to a post that she mad on Facebook where she described being ‘frightened by a member’

https://www.facebook.com/aspergersawarenesspage/posts/10151356131853383

 

Above:  Gemmarella described being ‘frightened by a member’ but there is no mention she has contacted the offended member to offer apologies or to try and correct the matter and remove the ban, as she has in the past, as stated in her Facebook post.
The above images were taken from publicly searchable and available sources. All pages are publicly accessible without login being necessary, and therefore The Paragraph strongly believes that no invasion of privacy has occurred or taken place. Facebook Inc gives an account of  ‘What is considered public information?’ Describing it as ‘content that is available to a public audience is considered public information’.
 
 
 Note: This article covers comments made in the public interest, a qualified privilege as long as the comments are under the definition of ‘responsible journalism’ – any comments using this defence must be ‘fair and accurate’ these comments are believed to be accurate as this article was written by the unnamed victim. The comments are fair  and truthful and that the point of view expressed here is and has been held by a reasonable person.

Advertorials differ from traditional advertisements in that they are designed to look like the articles that appear in the publication. Most publications will not accept advertisements that look exactly like stories from the newspaper or magazine they are appearing in. The differences may be subtle, and disclaimers—such as the word "advertisement"—may or may not appear. Sometimes euphemisms describing the advertorial as a "special promotional feature" or "special advertising section" are used. The tone of the advertorials is usually closer to that of a press release than of an objective news story.

Advertorials can also be printed and presented as an entire newspaper section, inserted the same way within a newspaper as store fliers, comics sections, and other non-editorial content. These sections are usually printed on a smaller type of broadsheet and different newsprint than the actual paper. Many newspapers and magazines will assign staff writers or freelancers to write advertorials, usually without a byline credit. A major difference between regular editorial and advertorial is that clients usually have content approval of advertorials, a luxury usually not provided with regular editorial.

A related practice is the creation of material that looks like traditional media (for instance, a newspaper or magazine) but is actually created by a company to market its products. One familiar example is airline in-flight magazines, which may feature reports about travel destinations to which the airline flies.

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